In January, London Met Paris In The Tom Martin London Workshop

 
St. Paul's Cathedral Sketch by Tom Martin (April, 2017).jpg
 

From the beginning of the year, I have been working closely with a special couple to create them a pair of special hand painted keepsakes to mark their 50th Wedding Anniversary, being celebrated this Spring. The design aimed to tell the story of the couple's early days together, a couple who met and often traveled together into London and, once married, honeymooned in Paris. 

The first design was a landscape of St. Paul's Cathedral (a London landmark sentimental to the clients), merged with the Eiffel Tower on the reverse set to a Spring scene. Golden hot air balloons surround the two design, with two balloons set in the foreground and larger in size reprocessing the client's children, while three are set in the distance and therefore smaller in size, symbolising their three grandchildren. 

 

 
 
 
 

The second ornament emerged out of the options presented to the couple during the design stage. The idea was proposed as a challenge, but one we would be happy to give our very best shot. Naturally, we did and the result was, I think, very good. I proposed to merge Trafalgar Square in London (an area special to the clients due to their frequent use of Charing Cross Station) and the roads emanating away from the landmark's centre, into the roads flowering out of the Arc De Triomphe, Paris. In knowing the process of adapting the artwork from a 2D drawing to a 3D hand painted image, this option presented several issues, mainly with the position of the horizon and where the roads would lead. Naturally, there is no literacy depth to a bauble, and nor is it easy to create a sense of depth as creating perspective means the lines of perspective go up and around the bauble as opposed to towards the centre of a given perspective point. However, we prosed the challenge to the workshop and we were able to create an ornament to add to the couples beautiful, growing and now very personal collection.  

 
 
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